Report a Bee or Mosquito Issue

Murrieta endeavors to promote a healthy environment through its Vector Control activities, which include treating standing water for mosquitoes, assisting the County with West Nile Virus tracking, as well as treating for bees while providing educational information to its residents. 

Vector Control

The City of Murrieta endeavors to promote a healthy environment through its Vector Control activities, which include treating standing water for mosquitoes, assisting the County of Riverside with West Nile Virus tracking, and providing educational information to its residents. If you would like more information on various vector pests, please visit the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources website.

Report an Issue

To report a bee or mosquito issue, please fill out the Report a Bee or Mosquito Issue Form.

West Nile Virus 

Although discovered in 1937 in Africa, the West Nile Virus (WNV) probably didn't make its way to the United States until 1999. Since then, however, it has caused concern all over the country especially during the summer months. 

A bite from an infected mosquito that is already carrying the virus is the cause of WNV. It is important to remember that not all mosquitoes are infected. In many parts of the United States, the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is greatest from July to early September when the temperatures begin to rise. Mosquito bites can be a risk all year long in some parts of the country especially in those climates that are traditionally humid and temperate. 

Not everyone who gets bitten by an infected mosquito will get the virus. Fortunately, most people infected with WNV will have no symptoms. About 1 in 5 people who are infected will develop a fever with other mild symptoms; however, some people who become infected with West Nile Virus develop a life-threatening illness that includes inflammation of the brain.

Infected Birds

West Nile Virus has also been detected in a variety of bird species. Some infected birds, especially crows and jays, are known to get sick and die from the infection. Reporting and testing of dead birds is one way to check for the presence of West Nile Virus in the environment. Some surveillance programs rely on citizens to report dead bird sightings to local authorities.

Sources

The sources of this West Nile Virus information is brought to you by MedicineNet, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and Mayo Clinic.